Viral and bacterial meningitis information

Recently there have been two presumptive cases of viral meningitis with students in our school district. Here is information about both viral and bacterial meningitis for your review and to refer to as needed. If you have questions about whether any of your children may have either of these based on symptoms, please contact your child’s health care provider.

Thank you. Brenda Jennings, R.N., B.A., Kenton City Schools Nurse

BACTERIAL MENINGITIS

There has been a probable case of bacterial meningitis diagnosed in your child’s school recently. Bacterial meningitis is caused by Neisseria meningitides, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus Influenza B (Hib).

Symptoms include the following: Sudden onset of fever, intense headache, nausea and often vomiting, stiff neck and light sensitivity. It may also be accompanied by a pink rash with small blisters.

This infection requires IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION!

Mode of transmission: Direct contact, including respiratory droplets from nose and throat of infected people.

Incubation Period- 2 to 10 days, commonly 3-4 days.

Susceptibility: People who are chemo, or who are on steroids for health conditions, people who have had their spleen removed. Pregnant women should check with their Ob-Gyn regarding this exposure.

Source of Information:
Control of Communicable Diseases Manual, 18th Editionan official report of the American Public Health Association, pages 257-271.

Meningitis-Viral/Aseptic

There has been a diagnosed case of viral meningitis in your child’s school. This infection is caused by Neisseria Meningitides virus.

Mode of transmission: Direct contact, including respiratory droplets from nose and throatof infected people.

Incubation period- 2 to 10 days, commonly 3-4 days.

The symptoms are: sudden onset of fever, severe headache, nausea, vomiting, stiff neck, behavioral changes, irritability, and sluggishness.

These symptoms require immediate medical attention!

Susceptibility: Anyone who is on chemo, who takes medication that suppress the immune system, such as steroids, etc. Anyone who has had their spleen removed is at risk. Pregnant women should check with their OB-Gyn immediately for exposure factors.

Source of Information: Control of Communicable Diseases Manual, 18th Edition, an official report of the American Public Health Association; Pages 257-271.